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First Suzuki Convention of the Americas

We both had the privilege of attending the First Suzuki Convention of the Americas in Cancun, Mexico, from May 1 to 5, 2019. Unlike the biannual Suzuki Conference in Minneapolis, which only accepts students who audition at the highest level, this conference was open to ALL, even the babies and beginners! There were advanced students, too, who had auditioned for placement in the orchestras, but seeing the full range of age and ability come together from 27 different countries really put an emphasis on the basic Suzuki philosophy: Every Child Can!

Kathleen had been asked to teach a recorder group class of students in Suzuki Recorder Books 1 – 3.  Here are some pictures of the class in action, student diploma presentations, and the final performance on the last day of the conference.

Thomas was invited to join Suzuki Early Childhood Education Teacher Trainer Wan Tsai Chen to work with the baby class:

The SECE classes and teachers in performance at the SuzukiADA sing Twinkle in English, Portuguese and Spanish.

Kathleen also had a student audition for the orchestra. She was selected to participate from applicants from 27 different countries. She is from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Her stand partner was from Patagonia, Argentina. Student exchanges don’t get any better than this!

Flute section of the orchestra

North Pole meets South Pole (almost!)

There was a wide range of sessions for teachers.  They were all given by other teachers from across the Americas. The focus of the sessions was on Suzuki philosophy, and most sessions were not instrument specific.

Session threads included the following:

  • building successful studios and programs, Suzuki’s idea of  developing character first and ability second, and shaping lessons that create practice assignments that really work to develop both of the above.
  • supporting parents, and the importance of making sure that parents coming in to a Suzuki program had enough understanding of how Suzuki method works in order to make the commitment to do it before they start lessons.
  • creating lessons and supplementary activities that develop the whole child. The right brain, logical thinking, assessing right from wrong, following clear instructions; and the left brain, creative, exploratory, and experimental.
  • developing effective practice and learning strategies in lessons and practice assignments. New research in neurology and psychology was discussed and ideas for creating lessons and practice assignments based on this research were discussed.

All teachers who attended also had the option of taking a 10 hour course in Dalcrose or Caroline Fraser’s class in teaching reading.  I chose the reading course, which had many excellent ideas and exercises for developing reading using the early Suzuki repertoire that the students already know. Kathleen chose the Dalcroze course.  We both enjoyed the courses and plan to incorporate many of the ideas into our teaching.

In addition to the orchestras for the more advanced students, book 1-3 students were invited to attend the conference to participate in group classes and masterclasses.  They also participated in a choral program in which they sang in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese.

The book 1 violin class, with teacher Koen Rens from Belgium, was another wonderful example of the student experience at the conference.

Through common repertoire and their Suzuki background, Koen brought these children from many different countries, speaking different languages, to a shared experience creating beauty together through music. Along the way there was much laughter and fun.

 

 

Fall practice ladder challenge

During the four weeks leading up to the school winter break, we challenged our students to keep track of the number of days they practiced, AND the number of days that they listened to their reference recording. For every day that they did both, practicing AND listening, they earned a rung on our studio practice ladder.

For every 50 rungs on the ladder, we made a donation through the Plan Canada Gifts of Hope  program. Up to 200 rungs on the ladder, we donated baby chicks;  up to 400 rungs, we donated beehives; up to 600, sheep; up to 800, goats, and if they got past 800, we would go for the whole barnyard. 🙂

This year the students built a practice ladder of just over 400 rungs, earning 4 baby chicks and four beehives.  The challenge is to get to the sheep next year 🙂

 

 

 

Listening for Easter Eggs

When we hide Easter eggs and give a child a basket to collect them in, we make sure that the eggs are hidden but still possible to find.
When a child plays a musical instrument, picking out the notes of the tune is like finding the eggs, and the eggs are “hidden” in the child’s memory.
If you don’t listen to the recording, that’s like giving the child a basket but not hiding any eggs.

I see students in my studio who stop playing as soon as they are uncertain of what comes next and look at me, expecting me to show them the next note. They do not try to find it. I do not want to tell them – I am trying to teach them how to find out for themselves. But if they haven’t listened to the recording, they don’t know where to look. I have other students who continue through into less familiar territory, and if they hear an error, stop and try to correct it, comparing it to their memory of what they are trying to play. These are the students who have listened to the recording, and by observing them “hunt and peck” looking for the solution, I learn much about how to help them learn, while the student is learning the value of persistence and determination. These are the students who already have some eggs in their basket and they know there are more out there! The others are standing with their empty baskets, disappointed because there are no eggs.

So hide some eggs so your child can have the fun challenge of filling his basket – listen to the recording!

(Thanks to the Classical Musicians Everywhere Facebook page for the photo!)

 

Kathleen goes back to Peru in January

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Recorder Book 1 Class, Lima, Peru, January 2014

I have been invited back to Lima, Peru,  for the 30th annual International Suzuki Music Festival. Looking forward to seeing all the students and teachers again! I am very happy that they asked me back – now that I have seen what they do at the festival when I was there last year I have a much better idea of how I can help.

 

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Recorder Book 3 class, Lima, Peru, January 2014

Hopefully my blogging skills are better too, this year, and I’ll be able to provide more regular updates. In the meantime I’ve been going back over some pictures from last year. The featured photo above is of the students from Huancavelica performing in their traditional costumes, and here are some of the amazing teachers that I had the pleasure of working with. I’ve kept in touch with many of them through social media, and some have already told me they are planning to return to the Festival to take another Teacher Training course.

 

I’ll be spending my unscheduled time over the holiday season preparing  course materials – imagine me sitting by the fireside with a mug of something hot, my feet up and  my computer on my lap, busy creating lesson plans.

 

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About Us:

Thomas & Kathleen Schoen are classically trained performers on both historical and modern flutes and violins. Their repertoire ranges from early music on period instruments to modern works that use phrase sampler loopers and other modern technology. read more

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    Thomas receives Long Service Award from Augustana Faculty U of A

    Thomas receives Long Service Award from Augustana Faculty U of A

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